Staff
Jane Kagon
Executive Editor
Marion Brown
Managing Editor  
Mike Campbell
Social Media Editor 
Maureen Feldman
Social Enterprise Editor 
Karina Saravia
Science Editor 
Nadia Walker
Entertainment Editor 
Ariel Lapidus
Communication Design Editor 
Bob Lasiewicz
Education Editor 
Kris Slava
Entertainment Editor 
Marty Perlmutter
Journalism Editor
Richard Kroon
Education Editor 
Lisa Mattson
Science Editor 
Corine Ganem
Journalism Editor

 

In partnership with

Search

Communication Design

 The JUST Social Media section is dedicated to followign the social media trends that create awareness, inspires thought and facilitates change in the world around us.

Social Media

Thursday
Mar222012

The Value of Data Visualization

Wednesday
Mar212012

How Overview Visualized 4,500 Pages of Declassified Iraq War Documents

Jonathan Stray
Idea Lab, March 21, 2012

Wednesday
Mar142012

Visual Complexity: Oil Money

visualcomplexity.com

This is an interesting map of the political campaign contributions from companies in the oil & gas industries to politicians who are candidates for the US federal office. This is a relationship map of the contribution network and therefore, the icons for the companies and candidates are placed so that they are as close as possible to whomever they contribute to or receive contributions from. Read more…

Friday
Feb102012

Blood Apples

Jane Kagon
February, 2012 

Nobody’s perfect. Right? So if “corporations are people my friend” as per Mitt Romney, then how can we expect Apple to be perfect? Especially when factory working condition malfeasances run rampant among most corporations “who” outsource. There are those who suggest that Apple is being singled out because of its success. Positioned at the top of the food chain carries risks. And as Isaac Newton observed: “what goes up must come down.”  But not Apple. Please not Apple! Only a snake would suggest that the Apple logo concurrently symbolizes Apple’s genesis and demise: the desire for knowledge - and the technology to deliver it - with the bite portending Apple’s exit from paradise, as we now see the underbelly and human cost of the hard drive for perfection.

 As I type on my perfect MacBook Air (okay it could have more battery life) the church bell starts chiming on my I phone 4, glowing red in its Mophie juice pack. It reminds me that my morning coffee is done steeping and that some young person in China has been up all night, after night, after night, after night, honing to perfection the glass covers for the I phone 5.  Want one? What would you give for one? Could you wait a few more days for a new Apple Product?  How much more would you pay for one if you knew that you were contributing to a better working environment for those who are  now slaving to make your life easier? Are there other ways that we who love Apple products can support Apple in designing a work environment that is, if not utopian, at least closer to the flawless product design standards that Steve Jobs demanded for the Apple of his eye?  Suggestions please. 

Friday
Feb102012

Is Apple's Suicide Factory Outsourcing to Even Cheaper Chinese Peasants?

David Gewirtz 
zdnet.com, October 18, 2010

Apple’s iPad, iPhone, and other Apple products are made in China by a $61 billion company named Foxconn. According to Reuters, Foxconn is the world’s largest maker of electronic components. Beyond Apple products, Foxconn also makes products for other technology companies, including HP and Dell.

Last May, we learned about the string of suicides on Apple’s production line. As of May 27, 16 people had attempted to take their lives by jumping off factory roofs (12 succeeded). At least another 20 were stopped before they could jump. Reuters reports that Chinese workers have “twisted Foxconn’s Chinese name so that it now sounds like: ‘Run to your Death’.” Read more…

Thursday
Feb092012

The Apple Connection

Walden Bello
Foreign Policy in Focus,  February 1, 2012

A recent two-part series in the New York Times on Apple, however, reminds us that transnational corporations and their practice of outsourcing jobs are front-and-center when it comes to the current economic crisis. And it is not only “smokestack” corporations like GM and Boeing that have massively shifted work from the United States to cheap labor havens abroad, but also those involved in the knowledge industry. Indeed, the highest proportion of firms with an offshoring strategy belongs to the information technology and software development industries. But while HP and Dell have become associated with outsourcing, Apple’s prowess at turning out products that capture the popular imagination has kept it from being tainted with the image of being a labor exporter. Read more…

Thursday
Feb092012

Apple's iPad and the Human Costs for Workers in China

Charles Duhigg and David Barboza
New York Times, January 25, 2012

The explosion ripped through Building A5 on a Friday evening last May, an eruption of fire and noise that twisted metal pipes as if they were discarded straws.

When workers in the cafeteria ran outside, they saw black smoke pouring from shattered windows. It came from the area where employees polished thousands of iPad cases a day. Read more…

Friday
Jan062012

The Media of Protests

Marion Brown
December 2011 

2011 was a year of protests. From Wall Street to Tunisia visual and social media spread the messages of multiple protests into the mainstream, often bypassing mainstream media entirely. Twitter organized Occupy Wall Street, fueled the Arab Spring, saved one journalist after she was abducted and cell phone videos documented police and military abuse around the world.

Social media greatly improved the ability of protestors to organize, and the speed with which the protests messages were disseminated led to near real-time citizen press coverage of the events. In the case of Occupy Wall Street and UC Davis, pepper spraying incidents were quickly videotaped and displayed around the world. Overzealous police tactics backfired as photos and videos were quickly seen by large audiences.

Websites such as occupydesign.org arose to support protesters with professionally design protest images. Even with such advances in technology, much of the imagery references the highly revered propaganda design of the early-mid twentieth century, but the messages come across just as strongly on the hand lettered signs which can be seen in this  Buzzfeed collection: The 40 Best Protest Signs of 2011

As the digital revolution merges with political and social revolutions it's clear that visual media has merged with not only the message, but the technology it lives on. Their fluidity and reach has breathed new life into protests and increased their effectiveness,  amplifying communication and transforming small groups into movements.

Friday
Jan062012

Occupy Wall Street and the Importance of Creative Protests

Allison Kilkenny
The Nation, November 21, 2011

Perhaps the single biggest factor that helped lead to the Occupy movement’s success in capturing the media and public’s attention has been its creativity. Novel protest strategies have served as OWS’s foundation since its first days. The very idea of occupying, and sleeping in, a park twenty-four hours a day was new and exciting.

Up until Occupy, most protests had become exercises in futility. Protesters would show up with their sad, limp carboard signs, march around for a little while—maybe press would show up, but most likely not—and then everyone would go home. Hardly effective stuff. Read more...

Wednesday
Jan042012

Wired for Repression – Surveillance Tech & Repressive Regimes

Bloomberg.com

Bloomberg's series "Wired for Repression" reveals how Western companies provide surveillance systems to authoritarian countries that claim some of the world's worst human rights records including Iran, Syria, Bahrain and Tunisia. The newest artillery for repressive regimes, the gear allows authorities to intercept their citizens' e-mails and text messages, monitor Internet activity and locate political targets through cell phone technology. Brandishing transcripts of personal communications and records of whereabouts, officials now routinely use such information to confront, arrest and torture dissidents. Read more...

Page 1 ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... 8 Next 10 Entries »