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Jane Kagon
Executive Editor
Marion Brown
Managing Editor  
Mike Campbell
Social Media Editor 
Maureen Feldman
Social Enterprise Editor 
Karina Saravia
Science Editor 
Nadia Walker
Entertainment Editor 
Ariel Lapidus
Communication Design Editor 
Bob Lasiewicz
Education Editor 
Kris Slava
Entertainment Editor 
Marty Perlmutter
Journalism Editor
Richard Kroon
Education Editor 
Lisa Mattson
Science Editor 
Corine Ganem
Journalism Editor

 

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Communication Design

 The JUST Social Media section is dedicated to followign the social media trends that create awareness, inspires thought and facilitates change in the world around us.

Social Media

Wednesday
Jan042012

Tweets from Tahrir Square

Alex Nunns
The Guardian, November 25, 2011

The aerial pictures showed an impressive mass of humanity in Tahrir, but it is on Twitter that the extraordinary individual stories of the Egyptian revolution can be found. Read more...

Tuesday
Jan032012

How Cellphone Cameras Shape OWS 

Joshua Holland
Salon.com, October 26, 2011

These videos have helped protesters create their own narratives and hold the police accountable BY JOSHUA HOLLAND, ALTERNET A woman takes pictures with her mobile phone at an Occupy Wall Street protest. Read more...

Tuesday
Jan032012

Bruised But Defiant: Mona Eltahawy on Her Assault by Egyptian Security Forces

Mona Eltahawy
guardian.co.uk,  December 23, 2011

It wasn't the Twitterholic in me that threw herself after the phone, but the survivor. For the first three or four hours of detention, I knew they could do anything and no one would know. In the event, it was near-miraculous that, while I was at the ministry, an activist with a smartphone came to discuss setting up a truce between protesters and security. As soon as he signed me in to Twitter, I sent out, "beaten arrested at interior ministry". And then his phone battery died. Read more...

Thursday
Dec292011

Posters From the #Occupy Movement

Wednesday
Dec282011

The 40 Best Protest Signs Of 2011  

Occupy, Egypt, Wisconsin, and Slut Walks. 2011 was filled with awesome protest signs. Here are 40 of the most memorable of them. Read more...

Tuesday
Dec132011

Games For Social Change - Seriously, Let's Play!

Jane Kagon
November, 2011 

The game industry has grown well beyond the music and motion picture industries combined. Now "social gaming" is about to overtake traditional educational models and through social media become the preferred and most impactful way to enhance learning and inspire social change.

Whether called "serious games", "positive impact games" "games for change" or "educational games", there are many asking if games can become the principal platform for social change. See Time magazine "Can Video Games Change the World?"  and Huffington Post's article: Video Games for Social Change . "Video games may be the next best way to tap into a new audience open to improving our world," Change.org suggests.

Coalescing around game design and game platforms as the foci for design communication in the 21st century are companies, communities of interest and universities including: E-Line Media  a publisher of game-based learning products and services; Games for Change which facilitates the creation and distribution of social impact games that serve as critical tools in humanitarian and educational efforts; American universities such as UC Berkeley, USC, MIT and Wisconsin; and Communities of interest: The Serious Games Initiative, which focuses on uses for games in exploring management and leadership challenges facing the public sector.

There are even entire genres of social change games now coming into play (pun intended) including "global warming games." A few examples of social change games include:

MTV's "Darfur Is Dying" raising awareness on human rights laws violence in Sudan 

Social game company, Zynga's Facebook game, "Farmville" with philanthropy issues embedded. 

Tuesday
Dec132011

Games for Social Change Festival

Tuesday
Dec132011

City Sandbox 

City Sandbox  is an "activists right to the city minded game" where groups communicate, generate community issues, identify priorities and ultimately create actions. The game works by observing community raised issues and offering a challenge to players/members to solve the problem. It is currently in Beta in the US and Poland. It has already become a popular platform for Participatory Budgeting.

Saturday
Dec102011

Games For Social Change

Global Warming games

 is a publisher of game-based learning products and services that engage, educate and empower,helping to prepare youth for lives and careers in the 21st Century. E-Line partners with foundations, researchers and government to develop and publish products and services that tap into the natural passions of youth and seamlessly cross formal and informal learning environments.

Wikipedia: A global warming game, also known as a climate game or a climate change game, is a type of serious game. As a serious game, it attempts to simulate and explore real life issues to educate players through an interactive experience.

Serious Games Initiative

 The Serious Games Initiative is focused on uses for games in exploring management and leadership challenges facing the public sector. Part of its overall charter is to help forge productive links between the electronic game industry and projects involving the use of games in education, training, health, and public policy.

The Education Arcade

Friday
Dec092011

Serious Games Resources

Saturday
Nov192011

The Art of Design Bends Towards Justice

For countries, cultures, capitalism, climate change and civilizations the Center cannot hold. And that’s a Center with a very big capital “C” if you add up all the little "c"s! where the gyres are swiftly widening. It's scary times for those few in power (the 1%), and it’s scary times for the vast majority who are powerless. We’re all in this together, riding the great paradigm shift.

A shining beacon, among just a very few, is a worldwide trend of social justice through design. Brightly manifesting itself out of the gray fog of uncertainty, the black ooze of oligarchic greed and totalitarian myopathy, design is being used by visual art visionaries to point us in the right direction. A new and necessary progressive movement, using the tools of design communication and design thinking, is inspiring us towards a more mindful way of being and a more humane sharing of the world’s limited and dwindling resources.

Shown in museums, presented in documentary films, and displayed in posters, the works of designers and artists, many of whom are collaborating with the local, indigenous citizenry,  are now exhibiting ways in which design is having a real world impact on "the other 90%" (see infra.) and which is bringing about true social change. A few examples include:

The Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum’s project  Design with the other 90% This exhibition highlights the growing trend among designers to create affordable and socially responsible objects for the vast majority of the world's population (90 percent) not traditionally serviced by professional designers. The exhibition is divided into sections focusing on water, shelter, health and sanitation, education, energy and transportation and highlights objects developed to empower global populations surviving under the poverty level or recovering from a natural disaster.

The Economist, in partnership with PBS NewsHour, is showcasing the work of independent documentary filmmakers from around the world. The film Waste Land follows renowned artist Vik Muñiz as he journeys from his home base in Brooklyn to his native Brazil and the world's largest garbage dump, Jardim Gramacho, located on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro.
 
Fighting Famine with Creativity: Poster Art Raises Funds for East Africa.
Famine and drought are laying waste to Eastern African countries like Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. A team of creative people is answering UNICEF's call for assistance by putting their talents to use. 50/50 is a project by social innovation labs Good for Nothing and Made by Many that's calling on artists and media makers to submit one fundraising project a day for 50 days, with the end goal of raising £1million ($1.57 million) toward UNICEF relief efforts. 

Wednesday
Oct262011

Occupying the Media

Marion Brown
October, 2011 

The Occupy Wall Street message started with Twitter, spread through the Internet, gained on the ground momentum and then became noticed first for the absence of mainstream media coverage and then very quickly, for being overhyped. As Occupy spread to an international movement with it's own messaging, content and delivery systems it became obvious that mainstream media would have to pay attention. But mainstream media struggled with both the complexity of the movement and the fact that the message was being framed without mainstream media's consent. The occupy movement had a broad, multi-themed message that did not fit well into a sound bite driven media landscape.

Images of large crowds, pointed messages scrawled on cardboard, and chants about income inequality, corporate greed and economic injustice spread online and formed a parseable body of information. Designers, and other media producers began to refine both the message and the medium, quickly producing videos, bumper stickers, even stamps to print graphics on currency.

After months of protests, media coverage is up (PEW) and he Occupy protests have reshaped the conversation and led to an increase in economic coverage. graphic examples clearly illustrate a coherent message. Ironically, much of the data is pulled from public government figures, but until now no one had publicly made sense of it. 

Now, the blogosphere is awash with clear illustrations of what the protesters are angry about. This movement could only have taken this shape with this level of technology and access to media creation and dissemination.


Wednesday
Oct262011

It's the Inequality, Stupid

By Dave Gilson and Carolyn Perot
Illustrations by Jason Schneider

Eleven charts that explain what's wrong with America.  

Thursday
Oct202011

99 Percent: Buckling Under the Pressure


BEN SARGENT, COPYRIGHT 2011 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

Tuesday
Oct182011

On the Ground at Occupy Wall St.

Ariel Lapidus
October, 2011 

Tuesday
Oct182011

Greenback Graffiti Occupies the Currency  

John Tomasic
October 17, 2011

It’s a tactic that puts supporters of Occupy Wall Street beyond the reach of pepper spray, and it spreads far and wide in a public and private way the message of crippling financial disparity that’s at the heart of the movement. It’s a literal take on the medium being the message. A project called Occupy George is turning your dollar bills into informational protest placards. Read more...

 

Monday
Oct172011

New Yorker Jumps on Board

Monday
Sep262011

Long, Long Historical Trend: Art Designed for Social Change

Jane Kagon
September, 2011 

“Political” art is tolerated, curtailed or oppressed, depending on the regime in power. Before the printing press and pamphleteers, social change was presented through images. Embossed on urns, woven into tapestries or designed on posters or walls, art and design have inspired civic action, encouraged revolution or at least changed perspectives.

An early example of artist as political provocateur is that of Arachne, the hubristic Greek peasant girl who challenged Athena, goddess of crafts among other roles, to a weaving contest. Athena wove a tapestry extolling the gods’ virtues. Arachne wove one exposing the gods’ follies. The people voted. Arachne won. Athena, was knocked from her pedestal, foreshadoweing the Greek civilization’s decline.

Today, as our political and economic institutions go through seismic changes, Alex Shaefer, a California artist paints images of banks on fire. Schaefer's depiction of a Chase branch up in flames drew the attention of L.A. police, who asked if he was a terrorist. Schaefer said the work was a metaphor for the havoc banking practices have caused the economy. (L.A. Times. 9/13/11)

In Shaefer’s case, the State, even in a Post-9-11-Patriot-Act era, is still tolerant. Not so Athena, who punished Arachne by turning her into a spider to weave webs for eternity. Lucky for Shaefer, and thanks to the non-spider world-wide-web, as well as the 1st Amendment, his paintings are selling on e-bay. Which raises the question does political art subvert or evolve the culture or both? 

For more about the evolution of art for social change See: Florida State U., Art & Design for Social Change Symposium.

Monday
Sep262011

Crowdsourced Public Art Project Captures Community Spirit Around the World

Good
September 26, 2011 

Rather than waiting for people to seek out his art in museums or galleries, artist JR brings it to the streets, posting arresting black-and-white portraits of locals around the world on the walls of their neighborhoods. His goal is to give voice and representation to communities that otherwise might be obscured, like women living in Brazilian or Kenyan slums. With his latest global art initiative, the InsideOut Project, JR is spreading his mission on a scale that was previously unimaginable, by crowdsourcing personal photos and the labor of posting them. Read more...

Saturday
Sep242011

Occupy Wall Street Art